01.4.2012 

Coming soon…

From the creative team that brought you Laser Jumanji…

[click for full size]

 12.27.2011 

Self Portrait

Click for full size

 12.17.2011 

Orchestra Hit Tribute

When you hear “Orchestra Hit” you know it’s going to be an Shaq Fu Mortal Kombat NBA Rap Battle to the death that will decide the future of Generation Now. But how did this timeless sound come to be? Where is it going and what does it want? Read on to find out.

Exhibit A:



From Wikipedia:

The sound was a low-resolution, eight-bit digital sample from a recording of Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite – specifically, the chord that opens the “Infernal Dance” section, pitched down a minor sixth and at a reduced speed.

Exhibit B:

Knowing that it would be decades ahead of its time, Igor Stravinsky composed the Firebird Suite in 1910 hoping that his vision might one day be understood by the Six Flags Great America Laser Show brought to you by Mountain Dew.

Exhibit C:

Keith Sweat likes Orchestra Hit… A LOT.



Exhibit D:

The Orchestra Hit is also a staple of Mecha Reploid Robot Anime Battles.

 12.13.2011 
My first Wikipedia contribution! I hope this brings attention to an overlooked issue in American cinema. Click for full size.

[Update: Apparently Wikipedia would rather delete my contribution than let people view the facts and decide for themselves. Very disappointing to see this kind of bias in a supposedly democratic system.]

My first Wikipedia contribution! I hope this brings attention to an overlooked issue in American cinema. Click for full size.

[Update: Apparently Wikipedia would rather delete my contribution than let people view the facts and decide for themselves. Very disappointing to see this kind of bias in a supposedly democratic system.]

 12.10.2011 
  • Bob Marley and Marlon Brando bought marbles and Marlboros from the embalmer in Malberg
  • If King King is Donkey Kong’s Father, does that make Don King the Godfather of Honkey Tonk?
  • The Basque Basilisk brought a basket of brie bisque and Bisquick biscuits to the bris whilst bristling at the Brazilian brass brassiere of Bossk the bounty hunter.
 08.27.2011 

DX7 Rhodes Tribute

The DX7 Rhodes is a watery, Crest toothpaste-glitter sparkle magical sound that has enchanted us all at some point or another. And yet most people don’t even know what it is! This post serves to remedy that.

Exhibit A:



From Wikipedia:

The DX7 Rhodes, also known as DX Rhodes, FM Rhodes, FM E. Piano, or Digital Rhodes, is a Fender Rhodes emulation originally produced by the “E. Piano 1” patch on the Yamaha DX7 (and TX-series rackmount) line of synthesizers.

This distinctive, fresh sound, while by no means an exact duplicate of the ever-popular Fender Rhodes electric piano, was nevertheless very reminiscent of it and has become, arguably, the single sound with which the DX7 is most identified. This sound was subsequently edited and expanded upon to produce the now famous DX7 Rhodes sound.

DX7 II (and DX7S) released in 1987 made a distinctive, bright, overtone-rich version of the “E. Piano 1” sound available as a preset. On the DX7 II this sound became known as “Fulltines.”[2]

Variations of the DX7 Rhodes sound were produced by individual artists and programmers, as well as manufacturers of other synthesizers. Though not always produced on Yamaha DX/TX equipment or using FM synthesis, the family of sounds based on Yamaha’s “Fulltines” became ubiquitous in popular music from 1984 through the early 1990s. Most synthesizers and home keyboards included an “electric piano” patch that imitated the DX7 Rhodes sound. In the 1990s, improvements in sampling technology, decreased emphasis on synthesized sound in popular music, and a resurgence of interest in vintage keyboard instruments led to the sound falling out of favor.

Because the “E. Piano 1” DX7 preset only faintly resembled a real Rhodes Piano, and the subsequent “Fulltines” even less so, devotees of real vintage electric pianos often express their distaste for the DX7 Rhodes sound.

Exhibit B:



The DX7 Rhodes featured prominently in the end credits of every early 90’s  animated Disney blockbuster.

Exhibit C:

In 1997, James Cameron’s ‘Titanic’ provided one final triumph for the DX7 Rhodes before it faded into further obscurity.



Exhibit D:

Dong-dong rocks out on the DX7 Rhodes for 11 solid minutes at some old lady’s funeral.


 

 07.16.2011 

My contribution to Twisted Biscuit 2011. It was humbling to compete among such talent and even more humbling to win. If you haven’t seen it already, Chris Thayer’s brilliant and merciless set is available at http://thisischristhayer.com/. Thanks to Ameen Belbahri and Miles K for making the show happen, and Ivan Hernandez for the video.. 

 06.19.2011 
 06.11.2011 
 06.10.2011 
Impression theme by Hello New York. This is a website related to comedy. It was created by a comedian to serve as the personal website for said (stand-up) comedian. If this website lacks jokes or things that make one laugh that is because it is not a comedy website but rather a personal website related to comedy (see above). The reason for this disclaimer is to remind the reader that this is a comedy-related website.